Miriam’s Kitchen Celebrates 30 Years of Helping

Miriam’s Kitchen served its first breakfast to the homeless on Oct. 6, 1983. It has been thirty years since that first simple meal of eggs, grits, toast and juice was offered. And over those same years, the Foggy Bottom program, which was founded as an interfaith collaboration between members of Western Presbyterian Church, George Washington University Bnai Brith, and the United Church, has continued to grow.

So has its mission. As Miriam’s Kitchen begins another decade, the organization’s leaders say they hope to help end chronic homelessness in D.C. by creating meaningful connections with displaced individuals, connecting them with permanent housing, and ensuring they have the necessary support to remain in housing.

Throughout the month of October, Miriam’s Kitchen will be celebrating its 30th anniversary with a series of events.

An exhibit of art works, created by participants in the Miriam’s Kitchen’s open studio art therapy program will be on display at Gallery 102, a student-run art space located at George Washington University’s Smith Hall of Art, 801 22nd Street NW. The exhibition, which features work in a variety of media, including painting, jewelry, photography and sculpture will remain on display until Oct. 25.

In addition, on Oct. 10, Miriam’s Kitchen will be honored with the Street Sense Founder’s Award at the Street Sense 10th Anniversary Gala—in recognition of its advocacy efforts on behalf of individuals experiencing homelessness.

And on Oct. 23, chef John Murphy, Miriam’s director of kitchen operations, will moderate a Food Day public forum at the Foggy Bottom Farmer’s Market. Murphy will be joined by local food experts to discuss the connection between food, community and culture.


Issues |Food Deserts|Hunger


Region |Foggy Bottom|Washington DC

information about New Signature, a Washington DC tech solutions and consulting firm

Advertisement

Ad: Wegmans making a difference together

email updates

We believe ending homelessness begins with listening to the stories of those who have experienced it.

Subscribe

RELATED CONTENT